The Story of Helium and the Birth of Astrophysics [electronic resource] / by Biman B. Nath.

By: Nath, Biman B [author.]
Contributor(s): SpringerLink (Online service)
Material type: TextTextSeries: Astronomers' Universe: Publisher: New York, NY : Springer New York : Imprint: Springer, 2013Description: XI, 274 p. 37 illus., 6 illus. in color. online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781461453635Subject(s): Physics | History | Astronomy | Astrophysics | Cosmology | Phase transformations (Statistical physics) | Condensed materials | Condensed matter | Physics | Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology | Popular Science in Astronomy | History of Science | Quantum Gases and Condensates | Física y Astronomía | Física y AstronomíaAdditional physical formats: Printed edition:: No titleDDC classification: 520 LOC classification: QB1-991QB460-466QB980-991Online resources: Texto completo
Contents:
Chapter 1: The Unbearable Lightness of a 'Noble' Element -- Chapter 2: From Alchemy to Chemistry -- Chapter 3: From Chemistry to Stars -- Chapter 4: Father Secchi, the Priest Who Became an Astronomer -- Chapter 5: Jansse, A Traveling Scientist -- Chapter 6: Norman Lockyer, Clerk Turned Astronomer -- Chapter 7: James F. Tennant, Soldier Turned Astronomer -- Chapter 8: Guntur, the Small Town at the Center of Attention -- Chapter 9: The Perpetual Eclipse of 1868 -- Chapter 10: Lockyer and His Cosmic Hieroglyphics -- Chapter 11: The Ghost Element That Refused To Be Identified -- Chapter 12: Helium on Earth -- Chapter 13: The Folklore and Reality of the Discovery of Helium -- Index.
In: Springer eBooksSummary: Biman Nath The Story of Helium and the Birth of Astrophysics Helium was the first element ever discovered by astronomers. Its presence was first indicated in the Sun and not on Earth. Further, its discovery marked the birth of the new science of astrophysics. However, it turns out that the events leading to the discovery of helium have been rather misrepresented in books, journals, and even encyclopedias. The usual story about its joint discovery during a solar eclipse in 1868 by French astronomer Pierre Janssen and late in England by Norman Lockyer, is far from the truth. Janssen never mentioned any new spectral line in his reports. The actual story turns out to be as dramatic as in fiction. This book tells the story without jargon, using the words of the scientists themselves (from their letters and reports), and rescues the real story from the backwaters of history.
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Item type Current location Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Springer (Colección 2013) Springer (Colección 2013) BIBLIOTECA GENERAL
Física y Astronomía Física y Astronomía (Browse shelf) Available
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Chapter 1: The Unbearable Lightness of a 'Noble' Element -- Chapter 2: From Alchemy to Chemistry -- Chapter 3: From Chemistry to Stars -- Chapter 4: Father Secchi, the Priest Who Became an Astronomer -- Chapter 5: Jansse, A Traveling Scientist -- Chapter 6: Norman Lockyer, Clerk Turned Astronomer -- Chapter 7: James F. Tennant, Soldier Turned Astronomer -- Chapter 8: Guntur, the Small Town at the Center of Attention -- Chapter 9: The Perpetual Eclipse of 1868 -- Chapter 10: Lockyer and His Cosmic Hieroglyphics -- Chapter 11: The Ghost Element That Refused To Be Identified -- Chapter 12: Helium on Earth -- Chapter 13: The Folklore and Reality of the Discovery of Helium -- Index.

Biman Nath The Story of Helium and the Birth of Astrophysics Helium was the first element ever discovered by astronomers. Its presence was first indicated in the Sun and not on Earth. Further, its discovery marked the birth of the new science of astrophysics. However, it turns out that the events leading to the discovery of helium have been rather misrepresented in books, journals, and even encyclopedias. The usual story about its joint discovery during a solar eclipse in 1868 by French astronomer Pierre Janssen and late in England by Norman Lockyer, is far from the truth. Janssen never mentioned any new spectral line in his reports. The actual story turns out to be as dramatic as in fiction. This book tells the story without jargon, using the words of the scientists themselves (from their letters and reports), and rescues the real story from the backwaters of history.

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