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Inorganic Nanoarchitectures by Organic Self-Assembly [electronic resource] / by Stefan Guldin.

By: Guldin, Stefan [author.].
Contributor(s): SpringerLink (Online service).
Material type: TextTextSeries: Springer Theses, Recognizing Outstanding Ph.D. Research: Publisher: Heidelberg : Springer International Publishing : Imprint: Springer, 2013Description: XVII, 165 p. online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319003122.Subject(s): Physics | Amorphous substances | Complex fluids | Nanoscale science | Nanoscience | Nanostructures | Surfaces (Physics) | Interfaces (Physical sciences) | Thin films | Optics | Optoelectronics | Plasmons (Physics) | Optical materials | Electronic materials | Physics | Optics, Optoelectronics, Plasmonics and Optical Devices | Soft and Granular Matter, Complex Fluids and Microfluidics | Optical and Electronic Materials | Surface and Interface Science, Thin Films | Nanoscale Science and Technology | Física y Astronomía | Física y AstronomíaAdditional physical formats: Printed edition:: No titleDDC classification: 621.36 Online resources: Texto completo
Contents:
From the Contents: Self-Assembly of Soft Matter -- Optical aspects of thin films and interfaces -- Structure-function interplay in dye-sensitised solar cells -- Experimental and analytical techniques -- Block copolymer-induced structure control for inorganic nanomaterials -- Crystal growth in block copolymer-derived mesoporous TiO_2.
In: Springer eBooksSummary: Macromolecular self-assembly - driven by weak, non-covalent, intermolecular forces - is a common principle of structure formation in natural and synthetic organic materials. The variability in material arrangement on the nanometre length scale makes this an ideal way of matching  the structure-function demands of photonic and optoelectronic devices. However, suitable soft matter systems typically lack the appropriate photoactivity, conductivity or chemically stability. This thesis explores the implementation of soft matter design principles for inorganic thin film nanoarchitectures. Sacrificial block copolymers and colloids are employed as structure-directing agents for the co-assembly of solution-based inorganic materials, such as TiO_2 and SiO_2.  Novel fabrication and characterization methods allow unprecedented control of material formation on the 10 – 500 nm length scale, allowing the design of material architectures with interesting photonic and optoelectronic properties.
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Item type Current location Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Springer (Colección 2013) Springer (Colección 2013) BIBLIOTECA GENERAL
Física y Astronomía Física y Astronomía (Browse shelf) Available
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From the Contents: Self-Assembly of Soft Matter -- Optical aspects of thin films and interfaces -- Structure-function interplay in dye-sensitised solar cells -- Experimental and analytical techniques -- Block copolymer-induced structure control for inorganic nanomaterials -- Crystal growth in block copolymer-derived mesoporous TiO_2.

Macromolecular self-assembly - driven by weak, non-covalent, intermolecular forces - is a common principle of structure formation in natural and synthetic organic materials. The variability in material arrangement on the nanometre length scale makes this an ideal way of matching  the structure-function demands of photonic and optoelectronic devices. However, suitable soft matter systems typically lack the appropriate photoactivity, conductivity or chemically stability. This thesis explores the implementation of soft matter design principles for inorganic thin film nanoarchitectures. Sacrificial block copolymers and colloids are employed as structure-directing agents for the co-assembly of solution-based inorganic materials, such as TiO_2 and SiO_2.  Novel fabrication and characterization methods allow unprecedented control of material formation on the 10 – 500 nm length scale, allowing the design of material architectures with interesting photonic and optoelectronic properties.

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