Normal view MARC view ISBD view

How Free Cationic Polymer Chains Promote Gene Transfection [electronic resource] / by Yue Yanan.

By: Yanan, Yue [author.].
Contributor(s): SpringerLink (Online service).
Material type: TextTextSeries: Springer Theses, Recognizing Outstanding Ph.D. Research: Publisher: Heidelberg : Springer International Publishing : Imprint: Springer, 2013Description: XVIII, 94 p. 45 illus., 38 illus. in color. online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319003368.Subject(s): Chemistry | Organic chemistry | Polymers | Nucleic acids | Chemistry | Polymer Sciences | Organic Chemistry | Nucleic Acid ChemistryAdditional physical formats: Printed edition:: No titleDDC classification: 541.2254 Online resources: Texto completo
Contents:
Introduction and background -- Revisiting complexation between DNA and polyethylenimine: the effect of uncomplexed chains free in the solution mixture on gene transfection -- Revisiting complexation between DNA and polyethylenimine: the effect of length of free polycationic chains on gene transfection -- Quantitative comparison of endocytosis and intracellular trafficking of DNA/polymer complexes in the absence/presence of free polycationic chains.
In: Springer eBooksSummary: In this PhD thesis, Yue Yanan addresses a long-overlooked and critical question in the development of non-viral vectors for gene delivery. The author determines that those uncomplexed and cationic polymer chains free in the solution mixture of polymer and DNA facilitate and promote gene transfection. Furthermore, by using a combination of synthetic chemistry, polymer physics and molecular biology, Yue confirms that it is those cationic polymer chains free in the solution mixture, rather than those bound to DNA chains, that play a decisive role in intracellular trafficking. Instead of the previously proposed and widely accepted “proton sponge” model, the author's group propose a new hypothesis based on the results of several well-designed and decisive experiments. These results show that free polycationic chains with a length of more than ~10 nm are able to partially block the fusion between different endocytic vesicles, including the endocytic-vesicle-to-endolysosome pathway. This thesis is highly original and its results greatly deepen our understanding of polymer-mediated gene transfection. More importantly, it provides new insights into the rational design of next-generation superior polymeric gene-delivery vectors.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Springer (Colección 2013) Springer (Colección 2013) BIBLIOTECA GENERAL
Química y Ciencias de Materiales Química y Ciencias de Materiales (Browse shelf) Available
Total holds: 0

Introduction and background -- Revisiting complexation between DNA and polyethylenimine: the effect of uncomplexed chains free in the solution mixture on gene transfection -- Revisiting complexation between DNA and polyethylenimine: the effect of length of free polycationic chains on gene transfection -- Quantitative comparison of endocytosis and intracellular trafficking of DNA/polymer complexes in the absence/presence of free polycationic chains.

In this PhD thesis, Yue Yanan addresses a long-overlooked and critical question in the development of non-viral vectors for gene delivery. The author determines that those uncomplexed and cationic polymer chains free in the solution mixture of polymer and DNA facilitate and promote gene transfection. Furthermore, by using a combination of synthetic chemistry, polymer physics and molecular biology, Yue confirms that it is those cationic polymer chains free in the solution mixture, rather than those bound to DNA chains, that play a decisive role in intracellular trafficking. Instead of the previously proposed and widely accepted “proton sponge” model, the author's group propose a new hypothesis based on the results of several well-designed and decisive experiments. These results show that free polycationic chains with a length of more than ~10 nm are able to partially block the fusion between different endocytic vesicles, including the endocytic-vesicle-to-endolysosome pathway. This thesis is highly original and its results greatly deepen our understanding of polymer-mediated gene transfection. More importantly, it provides new insights into the rational design of next-generation superior polymeric gene-delivery vectors.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha